Who Arranged The Good Friday Agreement

3. As a result, all participants reaffirmed their commitment to the complete disarmament of all paramilitary organizations. They also reaffirm their intention to continue to cooperate constructively and in good faith with the Independent Commission and to use their influence to secure the dismantling of all paramilitary weapons within two years of the approval of the Agreement, in the north and south, and as part of the implementation of the comprehensive regime. The Good Friday Agreement provided for a 108-member elected assembly in Northern Ireland. The Assembly would be able to exercise executive and legislative powers and protect the rights and interests of all parts of the Community. In accordance with the agreement, the assembly should be elected using the Single Transfer Voting System proportionally representative. In the spirit of safeguarding the interests and rights of all parties, the agreement also called for the proportional distribution of Committee members in the Assembly. The Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or the Belfast Agreement (irish: Comhaonté Aoine an Chéasta or Comhaonté Bhéal Feirste; Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance)[1] is a couple of agreements signed on 10 April 1998 that put an end to most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that had erupted since the late 1960s. This was an important development in the Northern Ireland peace process in the 1990s. Northern Ireland`s current system of de-decentralized government is based on the agreement. The agreement also created a number of institutions between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as well as between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom.

It is essential that the agreement obliges the parties to adopt democratic and peaceful methods to resolve political issues, to use their influence to end paramilitary groups and to normalise security measures in Northern Ireland. As part of the proposed agreement, the government has issued a number of financial and other commitments, as has the British government. Among the commitments made by the Irish Government is the work being done through the North-South Council of Ministers to carry out projects that benefit the people of the whole island, including greater connectivity, from the North and South and investments in the north-west region and border communities.